Coins of Carausius

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 17 October 2016

The rebel Carausius (Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Valerius Carausius) declared himself emperor, making Britain his base. Although he had no authority in Rome, he stressed his Roman identity by citing the poet Virgil on his coins. He also used Roman symbols, such as the wolf and twins. Upper image: Gold aureus coin of Carausius, from London, England, circa 293 CE. From the Cracherode Collection. Lower image: Radiate coin of Carausius, from London, England, circa 286-293 CE. G. Barnett bequest. (The British Museum, London).



About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

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