Ancient History Encyclopedia

About

Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

We combine different media, subjects and periods in interactive ways that will help readers understand both the "big picture" and the detail. Editorial review is a key component in our process to ensure highest quality.

Partners

We have a content sharing agreement with the non-profit arts website artwis, by the Kunstpedia Foundation.


We have a content sharing agreement with Chickasaw TV, the online channel of Chickasaw Nation.


We have a content sharing agreement with EAGLE, the Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy.


The European Commission's eLearning portal is recommending us as an open education resource.


We are an open education resource listed in the OER Commons.


We have a content sharing agreement with the history media company Past Preservers.


We are a contributing member of the academic Pelagios network.


We have a content sharing agreement with the photo archive SquinchPix.


We have a content sharing partnership with the digital history & travel magzine Timeless Travels.

Statistics

705 definitions
438 articles
2,697 illustrations
262 videos
6,466 references
3,526 tags
59,599 registered users

Latest Content

Become a Member

We're a non-profit organisation and we need your help: Producing free content and running this website costs money. Join our membership programme and support us with only $5 per month, and in return you'll have an advertising-free version of this website, print versions of articles, and additional benefits. Thank you for your support!

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published on 27 March 2015
The Lydian Stater was the official coin of the Lydian Empire, introduced before the kingdom fell to the Persian Empire. The earliest staters are believed to date to around the second half of the 7th century BCE, during the reign of King Alyattes (r. 619-560 BCE). According to a consensus of numismatic historians, the Lydian stater was the first coin officially... [continue reading]
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published on 25 March 2015
The Tartessian culture existed from the 9th to the 6th centuries BCE in the south-westernmost part of Spain. The landscape between the modern cities Huelva and Cádiz is defined nowadays by the lower course of the Guadalquivir, but in antiquity this area was covered by a huge gulf that bordered the Mediterranean Sea. Tartessos extended around the coasts... [continue reading]
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published on 23 March 2015
When I was planning my archaeological trip to Sardinia I discovered, thanks to vici.org (an Archaeological Atlas of Antiquity I have mentioned here before), that there were many Roman bridges still standing all across the country. Some are left abandoned and almost completely covered with vegetation but others are perfectly preserved. Ancient Roman bridges... [continue reading]
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published on 20 March 2015
Maya architecture has three regional styles. Jim O’Kon, a specialist in Maya engineering, and technology encounters a range of exotic animals in deepest rainforest while finding the style of the Ruta Rio Bec. Driving across Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula and traversing the Maya cities on the Ruta Rio Bec is a voyage brimming with ancient history blended... [continue reading]
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published on 19 March 2015
There is a Kickstarter campaign with the goal of launching a new ancient history magazine! We find that a worthy cause, so we'll let the publishers speak for themselves: Ancient History Magazine is a new magazine from Karwansaray Publishers. Karwansaray is an independent publishing house in the Netherlands. We specialize in the publication of historical... [continue reading]
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published on 18 March 2015
The Aztecs engaged in warfare (yaoyotl) to acquire territory, resources, quash rebellions, and to collect sacrificial victims to honour their gods. Warfare was a fundamental part of Aztec culture with all males expected to actively participate and battle, referred to in Nahuatl poetry as 'the song of shields', was regarded as a perpetual religious... [continue reading]
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published on 18 March 2015
Ancient History Encyclopedia is shocked, saddened, and deeply disturbed by the indiscriminate damage done to ancient artifacts at the Mosul Museum, Assyrian architecture at Nineveh and Nimrud, and the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Hatra by the Islamic State / ISIS / ISIL. The protection and preservation of ancient artifacts and sites is one of AHE's chief... [continue reading]
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published on 17 March 2015
We are excited to announce that Ancient History Encyclopedia (http://www.ancient.eu) is teaming up with Past Preservers (http://pastpreservers.com) to create a Youtube channel of online history broadcasting, and we’re looking for presenters! Were you born to be a presenter for ancient history videos? Are you interested in becoming a presenter... [continue reading]
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published on 17 March 2015
One of Ireland's most popular destinations is the Iveragh Peninsula — known to shamrock-lovers everywhere as "The Ring of Kerry." The Ring, lassoed by a winding coastal road through a mountainous, lake-splattered region, is undeniably scenic. Visitors since Victorian times have been drawn to this evocative chunk of the Emerald Isle, where mysterious ancient... [continue reading]
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published on 12 March 2015
While I was photographing two large blocks at the main hall of the Sulaymaniyah Museum, I read that these blocks were part of the Sassanian tower of Paikuli. “Paikuli”(Arabic: ??????; Kurdish: ?? ?????): a new name to me! I went home and surfed the net trying to find out what this tower represents. After getting the information, I phoned Mr. Hashim Hama Abdullah... [continue reading]
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published on 11 March 2015
On Friday evenings from 6:00-10:00 PM, the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City becomes a lively social venue with a full bar, series of special public lectures or tours, and complimentary gallery admission. In January, Ancient History Encyclopedia's Communications Director, James Blake Wiener, partook in the museum's end of the week festivities and learned... [continue reading]
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published on 09 March 2015
This is a cross-posting from the blog Gates of Nineveh. Part 1 and Part 2 of the original posts can be found there. Last week ISIS released yet another propaganda video, showing what has been feared since the fall of Mosul last summer: the destruction of ancient artifacts of the Mosul Museum. By now most of the world has seen this video, which has been featured... [continue reading]
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published on 06 March 2015
Mitla, located in the eastern portion of the Valley of Oaxaca in southern Mexico, was an important site of the Zapotec civilization. Gaining prominence from the early Post-Classic period (c. 700-900 CE), Mitla became the most important Zapotec city following the decline of the long-time capital Monte Albán. The city was contemporary with first the Toltec... [continue reading]
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published on 06 March 2015
The Dakhla Oasis lies west of the Nile river, between Cairo and Luxor. Egyptologist Garry Shaw follows the trail of one of the earliest visitors to the Oasis, Archibald Edmonstone, around Egypt’s ‘wild west’ It was dawn when I left the White Desert for Farafra. The rising sun had already revealed the petrified zoo of chickens, horses, and sphinxes... [continue reading]
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published on 25 February 2015
Senebkay's skull shows clear impact marks of an axe In collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities, a University of Pennsylvania team discovered new evidence on the life and death of pharaoh Senebkay, founder of the 16th Dynasty of the Second Intermediate Period of Egypt. The pharaoh's skeleton's forensic analysis performed by researchers directed... [continue reading]
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published on 25 February 2015
Stela found at Taposiris Magna, inscribed in Hierglyphic and Demotic side by side. The SCA Archaeological Mission in collaboration with the Catholic University of Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) working at the Taposiris Magna site succeeded in discovering a limestone stele inscribed with Hieroglyphic and Demotic inscriptions. The Minister... [continue reading]
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published on 24 February 2015
The gods were responsible for teaching humans how to write. Without their divine involvement, it would have been impossible for us, imperfect mortals, to develop such a valuable and powerful skill. This, and other similar explanations, was the way that most ancient societies accounted for the existence of writing. Itzamná in the Maya Book of the Dead... [continue reading]
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published on 23 February 2015
I was chatting with my uncle about the archaeological reliefs in the Governorate of Sulaymaniyah. The Governorate is part of Iraqi Kurdistan and is about 400 km north-west of Baghdad. He said that he saw a relief in the year 1985 on a top of a mountain, south-west of the city of Sulaymaniyah. The name of the relief, as the local villagers call it, is Naram-Sin... [continue reading]
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published on 22 February 2015
Nestled in the middle of the Iglesiente mountains in the southwestern part of Sardinia, the ruins of the Punic-Roman Temple of Antas offer visitors a truly majestic sight. After lying abandoned for centuries, the temple was discovered in 1838 and extensively restored in 1967. Most impressively, the original Ionic columns were excavated and re-erected... [continue reading]

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