Ancient History Encyclopedia

About

Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

We combine different media, subjects and periods in interactive ways that will help readers understand both the "big picture" and the detail. Editorial review is a key component in our process to ensure highest quality.

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We have a content sharing agreement with the non-profit arts website artwis, by the Kunstpedia Foundation.


We have a content sharing agreement with Chickasaw TV, the online channel of Chickasaw Nation.


We have a content sharing agreement with EAGLE, the Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy.


The European Commission's eLearning portal is recommending us as an open education resource.


We are an open education resource listed in the OER Commons.


We have a content sharing agreement with the history media company Past Preservers.


We are a contributing member of the academic Pelagios network.


We have a content sharing agreement with the photo archive SquinchPix.


We have a content sharing partnership with the interest-based content discovery platform Theneeds.

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Statistics

693 definitions
434 articles
2,539 illustrations
228 videos
6,345 references
3,457 tags
67,531 registered users

Latest Content

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published on 27 January 2015
A stunning mosaic floor referred to as the “Bird Mosaic” was uncovered by accident in 1955 on the outskirts of Caeserea in Israel, outside the walls of the ancient settlement. With no budget available for its preservation, it was covered over again until the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Director of the Caesarea Antiquities Preservation project decided... [continue reading]
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published on 27 January 2015
El Tajin is located near the coast of eastern Mexico and was an important Mesoamerican centre which flourished between 900 and 1100 CE. A part of the Veracruz culture, the city’s architecture also displays both Maya and Oaxacan influences, while the most famous monument at El Tajin is the splendid Early Classic temple known as the Pyramid of the Niches... [continue reading]
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published on 26 January 2015
The National Roman Museum is of course situated in Rome, but the collection is divided among different buildings around the city. One of the branches of NRM is situated in the Palazzo Altemps. Designed in XV century, this building passed from hand to hand of many well-off families,  until 1997 when it became a part of the museum. Today it is home to... [continue reading]
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published on 26 January 2015
Linear B Script was the writing system used by the Mycenaean civilization. Examples of this script have been recovered from late Minoan II contexts in Crete and Mycenaean IIIA-B contexts in mainland Greece, which suggest that the script was in use between c. 1450 and c. 1100 BCE. The use of Linear B Script was restricted to major palace sites such... [continue reading]
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published on 25 January 2015
For over three centuries, the ancient Maya flourished in Mesoamerica.  They built giant stone pyramids surrounded by dense jungle, used a calendrical system that made many believe that 2012 would be the end of the world, and created a writing system that is as beautiful as it is complex.  Its decipherment is ongoing, even today.  In fact... [continue reading]
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published on 25 January 2015
The magnificent temple on the Acropolis of Athens, known as the Parthenon, was built between 447 and 432 BCE in the Golden Age of Pericles, and it was dedicated to the city’s patron deity Athena. The temple was constructed to house the new gold and ivory cult statue of the goddess by the master sculptor Pheidias... [continue reading]
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published on 24 January 2015
In 1845 CE, the archaeologist Austen Henry Layard began excavations at the ruins of the city of Nimrud in the region which is northern Iraq in the present day. Layard's expedition was part of a larger movement at the time to uncover ancient sites in Mesopotamia, which would corroborate stories found in the Bible, specifically in books in the Old Testament... [continue reading]
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published on 22 January 2015
Last weekend I travelled to Toulouse to visit the fabulous exhibition on Roman frescoes being held at the Musée Saint-Raymond. The exhibition entitled ‘L’Empire de la couleur – De Pompéi au sud des Gaules’ (which translates as ‘Empire of colour – From Pompeii to Southern Gaul’) opened last November and runs through March 2015. Empire of colour... [continue reading]
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published on 21 January 2015
Ancient Warfare Magazine Ancient Warfare magazine is looking into starting a new magazine about ancient history in general. They are running a survey to better understand what their audience wants, which will help them to decide on whether they should launch the magazine or not. This is, of course, right up our alley... so we thought you might like... [continue reading]
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published on 19 January 2015
I was attending an international neurology conference in Istanbul, Turkey. I had two days left, and I thought to myself: "How about shooting some artifacts in the Istanbul Archaeological Museums?" I visit Istanbul every now and then and this museumsÂ’ neighborhood is one of my favorite spots. It's on a hill in the same complex as the famous Topkapi Palace... [continue reading]
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published on 14 January 2015
Eleusis was a deme of Athens and most famous for its annual festival of the Mysteries in honour of Demeter and Persephone. The site was also an important fortress protecting Attica and held several other important festivals, notably the Thesmophoria, the subject and title of a comedy play by Aristophanes. The site continued to be an important religious centre... [continue reading]
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published on 13 January 2015
A magnificent bronze statue of Hadrian, now on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, was found by chance by an American tourist in Tel Shalem (Beth Shean Valley, Israel) on 25th July 1975 while searching for ancient coins with a metal detector. Tel Shalem was once occupied by a detachment of the Sixth Roman Legion (Legio VI Ferrata). The 50 fragments... [continue reading]
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published on 12 January 2015
Greek Sculpture from 800 to 300 BCE took early inspiration from Egyptian and Near Eastern monumental art, and over centuries evolved into a uniquely Greek vision of the art form. Greek artists would reach a peak of artistic excellence which captured the human form in a way never before seen and which was much copied. Greek sculptors were particularly concerned... [continue reading]
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published on 09 January 2015
The Battle of Mons Graupius was fought in 83 CE between the invading forces of Rome, under the general Agricola, and the Picts, the indigenous people of modern-day Scotland, under their leader Calgacus. The only account of the battle is found in the Agricola by the Roman historian Tacitus (56-117 CE) who was Agricola's son-in-law. The location... [continue reading]
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published on 08 January 2015
Dodona in Epirus, north-west Greece, lies in a valley on the eastern slopes of Mt. Tomaros and was famed throughout the ancient Greek world as the site of a great oracle of Zeus. The site was expanded in the Hellenistic period, and one of the largest theatres in Greece was built which, recently restored, stands as testimony to Dodona’s importance throughout... [continue reading]
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published on 08 January 2015
The British Museum in London has just announced an upcoming exhibition that's right down our alley: Defining beauty - the body in ancient Greek art. The exhibition is on from 26 March to 5 July 2015. Tickets are priced rather heftily at £16.50 (children and museum members go free, discounted tickets are available). Pre-booking is already available... [continue reading]
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published on 07 January 2015
On October 4, 1961, the Sulaymaniyah Museum received several artifacts, part of the so-called "Nimrud Ivories." The package was sent from the Iraqi Museum at Baghdad and authorized personnel delivered it. The accompanying documents were written in the Arabic language and very briefly and superficially describe each and every item. I was able to get access... [continue reading]
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published on 05 January 2015
Sauska (also known as Shaushka, Sausga, and Anzili) was the Hurrian-Hittite goddess of fertility, war, and healing. She was worshipped throughout the region known as Hanigalbat (present day Iraq, Syria, and Turkey) from the time of the Hurrians (c. 3300 BCE), through the Kingdom of Mitanni (1500-1240 BCE), throughout the Hittite Empire (c.1344-1245 BCE), and beyond... [continue reading]
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published on 31 December 2014
This last year was quite a ride for the team at Ancient History Encyclopedia. Like every company, we had highs and lows, but in the end everything worked out just fine and we're in a much stronger position than when we started. Our biggest achievement is probably that this year, we became the world's biggest ancient history website (more about that below... [continue reading]

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