Ancient History Encyclopedia

About

Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

We combine different media, subjects and periods in interactive ways that will help readers understand both the "big picture" and the detail. Editorial review is a key component in our process to ensure highest quality.

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Statistics

736 definitions
441 articles
2,938 illustrations
288 videos
6,781 references
3,681 tags
60,219 registered users

Latest Content

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We're a small non-profit organisation run by a handful of volunteers. Each article costs us about $50 in history books as source material, plus editing and server costs. You can help us create even more free articles for as little as $5 per month, and we'll give you an ad-free experience to thank you! Become a Member

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published on 30 July 2015
The Erechtheion temple of the Athenian acropolis was constructed between 421 and 406 BCE under the supervision of the architect Philocles. The temple was built to house the ancient cult wooden statue of Athena and as a shrine to other local gods such as the early Athenian kings Erechtheus and Kekrops, and Boutes and Pandrosos. Poseidon and Zeus also had... [continue reading]
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published on 29 July 2015
Maya religious beliefs are formed on the notion that virtually everything in the world contains k’uh, or sacredness. K’uh and k’uhul, similar terms which are used to explain the spirituality of all inanimate and animate things, describe the most divine life force of existence. Maya belief establishes the creation and sanctity of human beings... [continue reading]
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published on 27 July 2015
In March this year reports swept through the global media that ISIS had used bulldozers to level the ancient city of Hatra. ISIS has already destroyed a number of irreplaceable sculptures from Hatra in the Mosul Museum, lending immediate credibility to reports from Iraqi antiquities officials that ISIS fighters had destroyed Hatra itself as well... [continue reading]
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published on 27 July 2015
For centuries, Lucius Cornelius Sulla has been reviled as a maniacal tyrant who defiled the Roman constitution and instituted bloody purges, but some modern historians assert that he has been judged too harshly. They present him as a republican champion who predominantly acted out of necessity and often with the best of intentions. As always, the truth... [continue reading]
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published on 27 July 2015
Pandora is a figure from Greek mythology who was not only the first woman, but --as an instrument of the wrath of Zeus-- was held responsible for releasing the ills of humanity into the world. Pandora was also an unrelated earth goddess in the early Greek pantheon. Pandora as an Instrument of Punishment The name Pandora means "gifts" and "all"... [continue reading]
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published on 24 July 2015
Kanchipuram (sometimes simply called Kanchi or Kanci) is an ancient city in the Tamil Nadu region of southern India. Once a capital of the Pallava dynasty, Kanchipuram was also a noted centre of learning for Tamil and Sanskrit scholars. Known as ‘the religious capital of the South’ its early 8th century CE Kailasanatha temple is one of the most impressive... [continue reading]
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published on 23 July 2015
This week marks the anniversary of the Great Fire of Rome, one of the worst disasters ever to hit the city of Rome. This tragic event took place during the reign of Nero in 64 A.D. The fire began in the merchant area of the city near the Circus Maximus  and rapidly spread through the dry, wooden structures of the Imperial City. According to Tacitus... [continue reading]
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published on 23 July 2015
When it comes to ancient history, Pakistan contains its fair share of treasures, one of the prominent of these being the ancient metropolis of Taxila. It is a city of the Gandharan civilization, sometimes known as one of its capitals, whose history can be traced from early microlithic communities at the Khanpur caves up to almost 1000 CE. Taxila was a hub... [continue reading]
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published on 22 July 2015
There are hundreds of great history blogs out there and we could write about them all day! These are the 10 history blogs Ancient History et cetera's blog editor follows on a regular basis. Following Hadrian This is the blog of history enthusiast Carole Raddato and she is particularly interested in anything related to the emperor Hadrian. Whenever... [continue reading]
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published on 22 July 2015
Co-authored by Steven Umbrello and Tina Forsee It is very common to hear in both academic circles, as well as more close-knit Stoic circles, Marcus Aurelius (121 – 180 CE) being referred to as the philosopher king. This is not an idea that is heavily under contention. Marcus Aurelius was definitely an amazing individual. He was adopted first... [continue reading]
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published on 22 July 2015
The Didache (Koine Greek: διδαχή), also known as “The Teaching,” or, “The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles,” is an enigmatic primitive Church document describing early Christian ethics, practices, and order. Discovery & Dating The existence of the Didache was unknown until its discovery by Philotheos Bryennios—a... [continue reading]
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published on 20 July 2015
Khajuraho was an ancient city in the Madhya Pradesh region of northern India. From the 10th to 12th century CE it was the capital of the Chandella kings who ruled Bundelkhand. Despite Khajuraho’s once great reputation as an important cultural centre there are no surviving non-religious buildings, but the presence of 35 Hindu and Jain temples make... [continue reading]
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published on 15 July 2015
The Wari civilization flourished in the coastal and highland areas of ancient Peru between c. 450 and c. 1000 CE. Based at their capital Huari, the Wari successfully exploited the diverse landscapes they controlled to construct an empire administered by provincial capitals connected by a large road network. Their methods of maintaining an empire... [continue reading]
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published on 14 July 2015
Around 1325 CE, southward migrating Mexicas or "Aztecs" came upon an island in Lake Texcoco, located in the highlands of Central Mexico. On this spot, they consecrated a temple and founded their capital city -- the legendary Tenochtitlán -- from which they initiated a wave of imperial conquests throughout Mesoamerica. Aztec civilization flourished for nearly... [continue reading]
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published on 13 July 2015
Out of all the history apps available these select few are ones used by Ancient History etcetera's blog editor, hopefully you find them useful too! Byzantium at the Getty  If you are interested in exploring the visually rich and  spiritual art of the Byzantine Empire, this app is for you.  It contains audio, video and photography displaying  items... [continue reading]
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published on 13 July 2015
Yama is the Hindu god of death, king of ancestors, and final judge on the destination of souls. He is also known as the ‘Restrainer’, Pretaraja or ‘King of Ghosts’, Dharmaraja or ‘King of Justice’, and as Daksinasapati is considered the regent of the South Quarter. Yama may also be referred to simply as ‘Death’ &ndash... [continue reading]
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published on 10 July 2015
Bhubaneswar (also spelt Bhubanesvar and Bhuvaneshvar) is a city located in the Orissa district of north-eastern India and flourished as a centre of Hindu worship from the 7th century CE. Its mass of well-preserved sandstone temples, all oriented around the sacred lake Bindusarowar, make it one of the most impressive ancient temple sites in the whole of India... [continue reading]
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published on 09 July 2015
In honour of Twitter’s international Museum Week (#MuseumWeek), I invite you today to discover some of my favourite sculptures from the collections of the Musée Saint-Raymond in Toulouse (France). The museum is among the best and richest archaeological museums in France and visitors can discover the Roman town of Tolosa (Toulouse in Roman times), the sculptures... [continue reading]
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published on 08 July 2015
Accidentally discovered by a French farmer in 1830 CE, the spectacular hoard of gilt-silver statuettes and vessels known as the Berthouville Treasure was originally dedicated to the Roman god Mercury. Following four years of meticulous conservation and research at the Getty Villa in Los Angeles, CA, Ancient Luxury and the Roman Silver Treasure from Berthouville... [continue reading]

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