Jomon Flame Pot from Dodaira

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 29 November 2018

"Flame" pots, such as this, are just one type of a long ceramic tradition that continued for some 13,000 years during the Jomon period in Japan. They were made in the Middle Jomon period (3500-2500 BCE) in the area that is now modern Niigata prefecture in central Honshu. The trumpet shape, with the rim flaring wider than the base, may have helped prevent the contents from boiling over when used on an open fire. The pots are extravagantly decorated on the outside and around the rim. They often have the carbonized food on the inside and so were definitely used for cooking. Earthenware vessel. Middle Jomon period, around 3000 BCE. From Dodaira, Tsunan, Niigata prefecture, Japan. (The British Museum, London).



About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

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