The Ishtar Gate of Babylon at the Pergamon Museum, Berlin

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Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by Osama SM Amin
published on 20 August 2014
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This gate was built at the northern side of the city of Babylon by the king Nebuchadnezzar II in 575 BCE. It was the eighth gate into the city of Babylon, Mesopotamia (modern Babil Governorate, Iraq).

The gate was built with glazed bricks and decorated with alternating rows of bas-reliefs of aurochs (representing the god Adad) and dragons (also known as Mušḫuššu or Sirrush which represent the god Marduk).

The gate (and its inscription wall or plaque) was excavated by a German archaeological team lead by Robert Koldewey from 1902-1914 CE. A complete reconstruction was made within the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany, during the 1930s CE.

This video features the gate and its inscription plaque together with wall plaques of the throne room of the king Nebuchadnezzar II. The Pergamon Museum, Berlin, Germany.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. (2014, August 20). The Ishtar Gate of Babylon at the Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.ancient.eu/video/527/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama S. "The Ishtar Gate of Babylon at the Pergamon Museum, Berlin." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Last modified August 20, 2014. https://www.ancient.eu/video/527/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama S. "The Ishtar Gate of Babylon at the Pergamon Museum, Berlin." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 20 Aug 2014. Web. 03 Aug 2020.

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