Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range (UNESCO/NHK)

Video

James Blake Wiener
by UNESCO TV NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai
published on 27 July 2018

Set in the dense forests of the Kii Mountains overlooking the Pacific Ocean, three sacred sites – Yoshino and Omine, Kumano Sanzan, Koyasan – linked by pilgrimage routes to the ancient capital cities of Nara and Kyoto, reflect the fusion of Shinto, rooted in the ancient tradition of nature worship in Japan, and Buddhism, which was introduced from China and the Korean Peninsula. The sites (506.4 ha) and their surrounding forest landscape reflect a persistent and extraordinarily well-documented tradition of sacred mountains over 1,200 years. The area, with its abundance of streams, rivers and waterfalls, is still part of the living culture of Japan and is much visited for ritual purposes and hiking, with up to 15 million visitors annually. Each of the three sites contains shrines, some of which were founded as early as the 9th century A.D.

Source: UNESCO TV / © NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai
URL: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1142/

Cite This Work

APA Style

Kyokai, U. T. N. N. H. (2018, July 27). Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range (UNESCO/NHK). Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.ancient.eu/video/1491/

Chicago Style

Kyokai, UNESCO T. N. N. H. "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range (UNESCO/NHK)." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Last modified July 27, 2018. https://www.ancient.eu/video/1491/.

MLA Style

Kyokai, UNESCO T. N. N. H. "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range (UNESCO/NHK)." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 27 Jul 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

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