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The Rise of Cities in the Ancient Mediterranean
Article by Oxford University Press

The Rise of Cities in the Ancient Mediterranean

The history of the ancient world has always been told as a history of cities, from Homer’s epic poems about events just before and just after the sack of Troy, through the prose histories of wars between Athens and Sparta, Rome and...
Theatre of Marcellus
Article by Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Marcellus

The theatre of Marcellus was the largest and most important theatre in Rome and completed in the late 1st century BCE during the reign of Augustus. The architecture of the theatre would become a standard feature of theatres across the empire...
Mithridates’ Poison Elixir: Fact or Fiction?
Article by Marc Hyden

Mithridates’ Poison Elixir: Fact or Fiction?

King Mithridates VI of Pontus, also known as Mithradates VI Eupator Dionysus and Mithridates the Great (135–63 BCE, r. 120-63 BCE) was a dogged Roman foe for much of his life. In 88 BCE, he orchestrated the mass killing of up to 150,000...
Roman Glass
Article by Mark Cartwright

Roman Glass

Roman glassware includes some of the finest pieces of art ever produced in antiquity and the very best were valued higher than wares made with precious metals. However, plain glass vessels such as cups, bowls, plates, and bottles were also...
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Article by writer873

Imperial Temples in the Roman Forum

The temples built in the Forum Romanum during the Imperial era (27 B.C. – A.D. 476) were largely built to commemorate mortal men who had been deified after death. These were usually Emperors of Rome who had been particularly influential...
Mythological Re-Enactments in Ancient Roman Spectacle
Article by Dana Murray

Mythological Re-Enactments in Ancient Roman Spectacle

To this day the ancient Romans remain infamous for their dramatic use of spectacle and other forms of entertainment. A lesser known variation of Roman spectacle is the mythological re-enactments that took place during the ludi meridiani (midday...
Arch of Janus
Article by Mark Cartwright

Arch of Janus

The Arch of Janus, erected in the 4th century CE, stands in the forum Boarium of Rome and was most probably set up as a boundary-marker rather than a commemorative triumphal arch. The four-way marble arch stands over the Cloaca Maxima or...
Financial Intermediation in the Early Roman Empire
Article by Peter Temin

Financial Intermediation in the Early Roman Empire

In this paper I use a theoretical hierarchy of financial sources to evaluate the effectiveness of financial markets in the early Roman Empire. I first review the theory of financial intermediation to describe the hierarchy of financial...
The Art of Ancient Rome
Collection by Mark Cartwright

The Art of Ancient Rome

Roman artists used every medium from amber to marble, frescoes to glassware, and produced works of art that still pull in the crowds wherever surviving examples are exhibited. The Romans copied, imitated, and innovated to produce art...
Daily Life in Ancient Rome
Collection by Mark Cartwright

Daily Life in Ancient Rome

The daily life of Roman citizens, at least in the big cities, was anything but dull. Assuming one could get away from one's civic duties and household chores, there were many activities available to distract and entertain. A trip to the...