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Mycenean Greece and the Orient about 1450 BC
Image by William R. Shepherd

Mycenean Greece and the Orient about 1450 BC

Mycenean Greece and the Orient about 1450 BC. Inset: Reference Map of the Nile Delta.
The Assyrian Empire and the Region about the Eastern Mediterranean, 750-625 BC
Image by William R. Shepherd

The Assyrian Empire and the Region about the Eastern Mediterranean, 750-625 BC

The Assyrian Empire and the Region about the Eastern Mediterranean, 750-625 BC.
Ruins of the Lion Temple in Jaffa
Image by James Blake Wiener

Ruins of the Lion Temple in Jaffa

The Lion Temple, located in present-day Jaffa, Israel, got its name from a lioness' skull that was found within it. This skull was apparently used in a ritual performed here at the time of the ancient Canaanites and from an altar that served...
Uncovering the Culture of Ancient India
Book Review by Alix Wood

Uncovering the Culture of Ancient India

Uncovering the Culture of Ancient India is a book published by Alix Wood Books that belongs to a series about ancient Britain, Egypt, Greece, India, Mesopotamia and Peru. This series of books has been made to create an interest in children...
The Phoenicians and the West: Politics, Colonies and Trade
Book Review by Maria Eugenia Aubet

The Phoenicians and the West: Politics, Colonies and Trade

The Phoenicians were one of the most influential ancient Mediterranean cultures, and so it is surprising how few general history books there are on the market which cover this fascinating civilization. In addition, of the few books generally...
Carthage: Fact and Myth
Book Review by Jessica Settergren

Carthage: Fact and Myth

Every empire has a cultural rival that both terrifies and fascinates the populace. During Rome's tenure as a Mediterranean superpower, the city had more than a few epic rivalries with its neighbors. Only one was so terrible, so frightening...
Assyrian Chariots in Phoenicia and the Storming of Khazazu
Image by Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Assyrian Chariots in Phoenicia and the Storming of Khazazu

The upper register shows Assyrian chariots in Phoenicia while the lower register shows the storming of the city of Khazazu. Shalmaneser III's military campaign in Phoenicia, c. 859 BCE. Detail, bronze band from the Balawat gates. Embossed...
Helen of Troy
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Helen of Troy

Helen of Troy (sometimes called Helen of Sparta) is a figure from Greek mythology whose elopement with (or abduction by) the Trojan prince Paris sparked off the Trojan War. Helen, considered the most beautiful woman in the world, was the...
Dido
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Dido

Queen Dido (aka Elissa, from Elisha, or Alashiya, her Phoenician name) was a legendary Queen of Tyre in Phoenicia who was forced to flee the city with a loyal band of followers. Sailing west across the Mediterranean she founded the city of...
Caesarion
Definition by Arienne King

Caesarion

Ptolemy XV Caesar “Theos Philopator Philometor” (“the Father-loving Mother-loving God”) (c. 47-30 BCE), better known by his unofficial nickname Caesarion or “Little Caesar” in Greek, was the oldest...