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Hellenistic Period
Definition by Antoine Simonin

Hellenistic Period

The Hellenistic Period is a part of the Ancient Period for the European and Near Asian space. The use of this period is justified by the extent of the Hellenic culture in most of these areas, due to the Greek political presence especially...
Between Alexander & Rome: The Hellenistic Period
Collection by Patrick Goodman

Between Alexander & Rome: The Hellenistic Period

The Hellenistic Period refers to the time between the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE) and the rise of the Roman Empire (32 BCE) in which Greek culture spread throughout the Mediterranean and Near East. Beginning with a series of conflicts...
Amastris
Definition by Branko van Oppen

Amastris

Amastris (c. 340/39-285 BCE) was a niece of the Persian king Darius III (r. 336-330 BCE) through her father Oxyathres. She was married in succession to Alexander’s general Craterus, the tyrant Dionysius of Heraclea, and finally...
Berenice II Euergetis
Definition by Branko van Oppen

Berenice II Euergetis

Berenice II Euergetis (c. 267-221 BCE) was a pre-eminent Hellenistic queen, who ruled together with her husband Ptolemy III (r. 246-221 BCE), when the Ptolemaic kingdom was at the height of its power, dominating most of the eastern Mediterranean...
Ptolemaic Dynasty
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Ptolemaic Dynasty

The Ptolemaic dynasty controlled Egypt for almost three centuries (305 – 30 BCE), eventually falling to the Romans. Oddly, while they ruled Egypt, they never became Egyptian. Instead, they isolated themselves in the capital...
Pergamon
Definition by Cristian Violatti

Pergamon

Pergamon was an ancient city located in the Anatolia region, approximately 25 kilometres from the Aegean Sea in present-day Bergama, Izmir Province of Turkey. The city had great strategic value, since it overlooked the Caicus River Valley...
Galatia
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Galatia

Galatia was a region in north-central Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) settled by the Celtic Gauls c. 278-277 BCE. The name comes from the Greek for “Gaul” which was repeated by Latin writers as Galli. The Celts were offered the region...
Wars of the Diadochi
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Wars of the Diadochi

On June 10, 323 BCE Alexander the Great died in Babylon.  Although historians have debated the exact cause most agree that the empire he built was left without adequate leadership for there was no clear successor or heir. The military...
Seleucus I Nicator
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Seleucus I Nicator

Seleucus I Nicator (l. c. 358-281 BCE, r. 305-281 BCE) was one of the generals of Alexander the Great (l. 356-323 BCE) who make up the group of Diadochi ("successors") who divided the vast Macedonian Empire between them after Alexander's...
Demetrius I of Macedon
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Demetrius I of Macedon

Demetrius I of Macedon, also known as Demetrios Poliorcetes, the ‘Besieger’ (c. 336 - c. 282 BCE), was a Macedonian king who, along with his father Antigonus I, fought for control of Alexander the Great’s empire in the ‘Successor...