Search Results

Search

The Sea Dogs - Queen Elizabeth's Privateers
Article by Mark Cartwright

The Sea Dogs - Queen Elizabeth's Privateers

The sea dogs, as they were disparagingly called by the Spanish authorities, were privateers who, with the consent and sometimes financial support of Elizabeth I of England (r. 1558-1603 CE), attacked and plundered Spanish colonial settlements...
Sports, Games & Entertainment in the Elizabethan Era
Article by Mark Cartwright

Sports, Games & Entertainment in the Elizabethan Era

Leisure activities in the Elizabethan era (1558-1603 CE) became more varied than in any previous period of English history and more professional with what might be called the first genuine entertainment industry providing the public with...
The Battle of Zama - The Beginning of Roman Conquest
Article by Joshua J. Mark

The Battle of Zama - The Beginning of Roman Conquest

The Battle of Zama (202 BCE) was the final engagement of the Second Punic War (218-202 BCE) at which Hannibal Barca of Carthage (l. 247-183 BCE) was defeated by Scipio Africanus of Rome (l. 236-183 BCE) ending the conflict in Rome’s...
The Battle of the Catalaunian Fields
Article by Joshua J. Mark

The Battle of the Catalaunian Fields

The Battle of the Catalaunian Fields (also known as The Battle of Chalons, The Battle of Maurica) was one of the most decisive military engagements in history between the forces of the Roman Empire under Flavius Aetius (391-454 CE) and those...
Daily Life in the Inca Empire
Article by Mark Cartwright

Daily Life in the Inca Empire

Daily life in the Inca empire was characterised by strong family relationships, agricultural labour, sometimes enforced state or military service for males, and occasional lighter moments of festivities to celebrate important life events...
Comedy & Tragedy: the Drama of Greek Theatre
Collection by Mark Cartwright

Comedy & Tragedy: the Drama of Greek Theatre

Greek theatre likely sprang from the lyrical performance of ancient epic poetry and the rituals performed in the worship of the god Dionysos where goats were sacrificed and participants wore masks. From the 6th century BCE...
Women in Ancient Greece
Article by Mark Cartwright

Women in Ancient Greece

Women in the ancient Greek world had few rights in comparison to male citizens. Unable to vote, own land, or inherit, a woman’s place was in the home and her purpose in life was the rearing of children. This, though, is a general description...
Phoenicia
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Phoenicia

Phoenicia was an ancient civilization composed of independent city-states located along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea stretching through what is now Syria, Lebanon and northern Israel. The Phoenicians were a great maritime people, known...
The Seven Wonders
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

The Seven Wonders

The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World were: the Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt the Hanging Gardens of Babylon the Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Greece the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus the Colossus...
Etruscan Society
Article by Mark Cartwright

Etruscan Society

The social organisation of the ancient Etruscans, a civilization which flourished in central Italy between the 8th and 3rd century BCE, can only be pieced together from a collection of rather unsatisfactory sources which, unfortunately, do...