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Greek Architecture
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Greek Architecture

Greek architects provided some of the finest and most distinctive buildings in the entire Ancient World and some of their structures, such as temples, theatres, and stadia, would become staple features of towns and cities from antiquity onwards...
Greek Theatre Architecture
Article by Mark Cartwright

Greek Theatre Architecture

The ancient Greeks built open-air theatres where the public could watch the performances of Greek comedy, tragedy, and satyr plays. They then exported the idea to their colonies throughout the Aegean so that theatres became a typical feature...
A Visual Glossary of Classical Architecture
Article by Mark Cartwright

A Visual Glossary of Classical Architecture

[image:945] Abacus - a large slab placed above the column capital to support the architrave or an arch placed above it. [image:1097] Akroterion - a decorative piece added to the roof of a temple at the apex and corners, usually made...
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus located on the western coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) was built in the 6th century BCE, and such was its tremendous size, double the dimensions of other Greek temples including the Parthenon, that it...
Vitruvius
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Vitruvius

Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (c. 90 - c. 20 BCE), better known simply as Vitruvius, was a Roman military engineer and architect who wrote De Architectura (On Architecture), a treatise which combines the history of ancient architecture and...
Parthenon
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Parthenon

The magnificent temple on the Acropolis of Athens, known as the Parthenon, was built between 447 and 432 BCE in the Age of Pericles, and it was dedicated to the city’s patron deity Athena. The temple was constructed to house the new...
Acropolis
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Acropolis

An 'acropolis' is any citadel or complex built on a high hill. The name derives from the Greek akro, high or extreme/extremity or edge, and polis, city, translated as 'high city', 'city on the edge' or 'city in...
Gymnasium
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Gymnasium

The Gymnasium was a Greek building originally used for athletic activities but which came, over time, to be used also as a place of study and philosophical discussion. In the Hellenistic Period, gymnasia became highly standardized both in...
Aqueduct
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Aqueduct

In antiquity, aqueducts were a means to transport water from one place to another, achieving a regular and controlled water supply to a place that would not otherwise have received sufficient water to meet basic needs such as irrigation of...
Propylaea
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Propylaea

Propylaea is the name given to monumental gates or entranceways to a specific space, usually to a temple or religious complex and as such they acted as a symbolic partition between the secular and religious parts of a city. Less complex examples...