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In Search of the Promised Land:  Saint Brendan’s Voyage
Article by Andrea Maraschi

In Search of the Promised Land: Saint Brendan’s Voyage

Between the 9th and the 10th century CE, in an unknown European abbey, an anonymous author told the story of an Irish monk and his 14 companions who embarked on a dangerous journey in the 5th century CE. The monk’s name was Brendan...
The Daily Life of Medieval Nuns
Article by Mark Cartwright

The Daily Life of Medieval Nuns

Monasteries were an ever-present feature of the Medieval landscape and perhaps more than half were devoted solely to women. The rules and lifestyle within a nunnery were very similar to those in a male monastery. Nuns took vows of chastity...
The Didache: A Moral and Liturgical Document of Instruction
Article by John S. Knox

The Didache: A Moral and Liturgical Document of Instruction

During the early years of Christianity, many of the church leaders or "Fathers" wrote down admonishments and instruction on what it meant to be a follower of Jesus as well as what liturgical ceremonies should be followed as a believer...
Saint Augustine of Hippo & His Confession of Faith
Article by John S. Knox

Saint Augustine of Hippo & His Confession of Faith

Few theologians have attained as much renown and influence in history as Saint Augustine of Hippo (354-430 CE), a 'Doctor' of the Catholic Church and simply known by his peers as 'The Knowledgeable One.' A brilliant man who...
Ignatius of Antioch & His Letter to the Ephesians
Article by John S. Knox

Ignatius of Antioch & His Letter to the Ephesians

For many people, the origins of the Christian church are shrouded in obscurity outside of the biblical narratives concerning Jesus Christ and his Jewish followers. Yet, after the crucifixion of Jesus and the initial missions work across the...
Unam Sanctam: Spiritual Authority & the Medieval Church
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Unam Sanctam: Spiritual Authority & the Medieval Church

The medieval Church developed and retained its power by encouraging the innate human fear of death and the Church’s vision of itself as the only path to salvation from hell. The pagan systems of the past all had some version of judgment...
A Medieval Christmas
Article by Mark Cartwright

A Medieval Christmas

Christmas was one of the highlights of the medieval calendar, not only for the rich but also for the peasantry. For the longest holiday of the year, typically the full twelve days of Christmas, people stopped work, homes were decorated and...
Mavia's Revolt & the Christian Question
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Mavia's Revolt & the Christian Question

In 378 CE the Tanukhid queen Mavia (r. c. 375 - c. 425 CE) of the Saracens led a successful revolt against the Roman Empire, pitting her forces against the armies under the emperor Valens (364-378 CE). Launching her insurrection from the...
Cats in the Middle Ages
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Cats in the Middle Ages

The life of a cat in the Middle Ages (c. 476-1500 CE) differed significantly from that of a dog owing primarily to its association with witchcraft, darkness, and the devil. In the ancient world, the cat was regarded highly by cultures as...
Nazca Lines
Article by Mark Cartwright

Nazca Lines

The Nazca (or Nasca) civilization flourished in southern Peru between 200 BCE and 600 CE and amongst their most famous legacies are the geoglyphs and lines - often referred to as Nazca Lines - drawn across deserts and hills along the eastern...