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Search Results: Carthaginian Warfare

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Roman Art
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Art

The Romans controlled such a vast empire for so long a period that a summary of the art produced in that time can only be a brief and selective one. Perhaps, though, the greatest points of distinction for Roman art are its very diversity...
Coinage
Definitionby Jan van der Crabben

Coinage

Coins were introduced as a method of payment around the 6th or 5th century BCE. The invention of coins is still shrouded in mystery: According to Herdotous (I, 94), coins were first minted by the Lydians, while Aristotle claims that the first...
Phoenician Religion
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Phoenician Religion

The Phoenician Religion, as in many other ancient cultures, was an inseparable part of everyday life. Gods such as Baal, Astarte, and Melqart had temples built in their name, offerings and sacrifices were regularly made to them, royalty performed...
Silver in Antiquity
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Silver in Antiquity

Silver had great value and aesthetic appeal in many ancient cultures where it was used to make jewellery, tableware, figurines, ritual objects and rough-cut pieces known as hacksilver which could be used in trade or to store wealth. The metal...
Celtic Coinage
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Celtic Coinage

The coinage of the ancient Celts, minted from the early 3rd century BCE to the 1st century CE, at first imitated Greek and then Roman coins. Celtic engravers then soon developed their own unique style, creating distinctive coins with depictions...
Numismatics
Definitionby Jenni Irving

Numismatics

Numismatics the study of coinage, and is a wonderfully useful tool in the archaeologist's and historian's toolbox. One of the best things for an archaeologist to find while digging is a coin. The reason is simple; it can instantly provide...
Phoenician-Punic Grinning Mask
Imageby Carole Raddato

Phoenician-Punic Grinning Mask

Phoenician grinning mask, 4th century BCE, found in a grave at San Sperate in Sardinia. Masks like these were used to ward off evil. (Cagliari Museo Archeologico Nazionale)
Punic Stele with Goddess Tanit
Imageby Carole Raddato

Punic Stele with Goddess Tanit

Punic stele with a crescent moon and the sign of the Phoenician goddess of fertility Tanit, found in Cirta (ancient Constantine, Algeria), around 300-200 BCE. Now in Louvre Lens, France.
Artillery in Medieval Europe
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Artillery in Medieval Europe

Artillery weapons in medieval Europe included the mounted crossbow (ballista) and single-arm torsion catapult (mangonel), both similar to ancient Roman machines. As armies battled further afield such as in the Byzantine Empire and against...
Trireme
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Trireme

Fast, manoeuvrable, and with a bronze-sheathed ram on the prow, the trireme (Greek triērēs) was the devastating warship which permitted Athens to build its maritime empire and dominate the Aegean in the 5th century BCE.  ...