Ancient History Encyclopedia has a new name!

We are now World History Encyclopedia to better reflect the breadth of our non-profit organization's mission. Learn More

Search Results

Search

Battle of Manzikert
Article by Mark Cartwright

Battle of Manzikert

The Battle of Manzikert (Mantzikert) in ancient Armenia in August 1071 CE was one of the greatest defeats suffered by the Byzantine Empire. The victorious Seljuk army captured the Byzantine emperor Romanos IV Diogenes, and, with the empire...
Battle of Tricamarum
Article by Nathan Stafford

Battle of Tricamarum

The Battle of Tricamarum (533 CE) was the second and last major battle of the Vandalic War (533 – 534 CE). The battle was fought between the forces of the Byzantine Empire under the leadership of the general Belisarius (500 &ndash...
Byzantine Monasticism
Article by Mark Cartwright

Byzantine Monasticism

Monasticism, that is individuals devoting themselves to an ascetic life in a monastery for devotional purposes, was an ever-present feature of the Byzantine empire. Monasteries became powerful landowners and a voice to be listened to in imperial...
1453: The Fall of Constantinople
Article by Mark Cartwright

1453: The Fall of Constantinople

The city of Constantinople (modern Istanbul) was founded by Roman emperor Constantine I in 324 CE and it acted as the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire, or Byzantine Empire as it has later become known, for well over 1,000 years. Although...
Byzantine Icons
Article by Mark Cartwright

Byzantine Icons

Icons, that is images of holy persons, were an important part of the Byzantine Christian Church from the 3rd century CE onwards. Venerated in churches, public places, and private homes, they were often believed to have protective properties...
The Great Palace of Constantinople
Article by Mark Cartwright

The Great Palace of Constantinople

The Great Palace of Constantinople was the magnificent residence of Byzantine emperors and their court officials which included a golden throne room with wondrous mechanical devices, reception halls, chapels, treasury, and gardens. In use...
Procopius on the Plague of Justinian: Text & Commentary
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Procopius on the Plague of Justinian: Text & Commentary

The Plague of Justinian (541-542 CE and onwards) is the first fully documented case of bubonic plague in history. It is named for the emperor of the Byzantine Empire at the time, Justinian I (r. 527-565 CE) and recorded by his court historian...
The Hippodrome of Constantinople
Article by Mark Cartwright

The Hippodrome of Constantinople

The Hippodrome of Constantinople was an arena used for chariot racing throughout the Byzantine period. First built during the reign of Roman emperor Septimius Severus in the early 3rd century CE, the structure was made more grandiose by emperor...
The Rise and Fall of the Byzantine Empire - Leonora Neville
Video by TED-Ed

The Rise and Fall of the Byzantine Empire - Leonora Neville

Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-byzantine-empire-leonora-neville Most history books will tell you that the Roman Empire fell in the fifth...
What Caused the Fall of the Western Roman Empire?
Video by Ancient History Encyclopedia

What Caused the Fall of the Western Roman Empire?

There were many factors that contributed to the fall of the Western Roman Empire, all of which will be discussed throughout the video. The Western Roman Empire took 300 years to decline before it eventually fell in c. 476 CE. The Eastern...