Ancient History Encyclopedia has a new name!

We are now World History Encyclopedia to better reflect the breadth of our non-profit organization's mission. Learn More

Search Results

Search

Buddhism
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Buddhism

Buddhism is a non-theistic religion (no belief in a creator god), also considered a philosophy and a moral discipline, originating in India in the 6th and 5th centuries BCE. It was founded by the sage Siddhartha Gautama (the Buddha l. c...
Mahayana Buddhism
Definition by Charley Linden Thorp

Mahayana Buddhism

Mahayana Buddhism (or the Mahayanas) can be defined as a major movement in the history of Buddhism which has its origins in northern India. It is made up of many schools and reinterpretations of fundamental human beliefs, values and ideals...
Esoteric Buddhism
Definition by Charley Linden Thorp

Esoteric Buddhism

Esoteric Buddhism is also known by the terms Mantrayana and Tantra. These teachings are secret and not available to just anyone, whereas Exoteric teachings learned from books are accessible to everyone. The student of Esotericism (Jap...
Interview: Buddhism in Korea
Article by James Blake Wiener

Interview: Buddhism in Korea

In this interview, James Blake Wiener, Co-Founder and Communications Director at Ancient History Encyclopedia (AHE), speaks to Emeritus Professor James H. Grayson, Professor of Korean Studies at the University of Sheffield, about the historical...
Buddhism in Ancient Japan
Article by Mark Cartwright

Buddhism in Ancient Japan

Buddhism was introduced to ancient Japan via Korea in the 6th century CE with various sects following in subsequent centuries via China. It was readily accepted by both the elite and ordinary populace because it confirmed the political and...
Buddhism in Ancient Korea
Article by Mark Cartwright

Buddhism in Ancient Korea

Buddhism, in Korean Bulgyo, was introduced by monks who visited and studied in China and then brought back various Buddhist sects during the Three Kingdoms period. It became the official state religion in all Three Kingdoms and subsequent...
Prince Shotoku: Founder of Japanese Buddhism and the Japanese Nation
Article by Charley Linden Thorp

Prince Shotoku: Founder of Japanese Buddhism and the Japanese Nation

In Japan in 573 CE Anahobe, the wife of the Emperor's son, had a dream of a priest in golden robes who asked her if he could lodge in her womb as he was about to be born as a world-saving Bodhisattva. The child was born painlessly and...
Zen Buddhism in Ancient Korea
Article by Mark Cartwright

Zen Buddhism in Ancient Korea

Buddhism was introduced from China to ancient Korea in the 4th century BCE and adopted as the official state religion by the Kingdoms of Baekje, Goguryeo, and Silla. The faith split into separate divisions across Asia, one of the most important...
Cunda: the Beginnings of Lay Buddhism
Article by Charley Linden Thorp

Cunda: the Beginnings of Lay Buddhism

The frail Buddha Shakyamuni, known as Gautama Buddha and the Historical Buddha, had reached the end of his physical life and long teaching career. He and his close disciples decided on his final resting place under the twin sala trees in...
Ashoka the Great
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Ashoka the Great

Ashoka the Great (r. 268-232 BCE) was the third king of the Mauryan Empire (322-185 BCE) best known for his renunciation of war, development of the concept of dhamma (pious social conduct), and promotion of Buddhism as well as his effective...