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Akrotiri Frescoes
Article by Mark Cartwright

Akrotiri Frescoes

The Bronze Age frescoes from Akrotiri on the Aegean island of Thera (modern-day Santorini) provide some of the most famous images from the ancient Greek world. Sometime between 1650 and 1550 BCE Thera suffered a devastating earthquake which...
Theseus & the Minotaur: More than a Myth?
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Theseus & the Minotaur: More than a Myth?

Until Sir Arthur Evans unearthed the palace of Knossos, the half-man-half bull killed by Theseus was considered just a popular legend; archaeology changed that perception. King Minos, of Crete, fought hard with his brother to ascend the...
Queen Hatshepsut: Daughter of Amun, Pharaoh of Egypt
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Queen Hatshepsut: Daughter of Amun, Pharaoh of Egypt

Hatshepsut, whose name means "Foremost of Noble Women" or "First Among Noble Women" (royal name, Ma’at-ka-re, translated as "spirit of harmony and truth") was the fifth ruler of the 18th Dynasty...
Minoan Jewellery
Article by Mark Cartwright

Minoan Jewellery

The jewellery of the Minoan civilization based on Bronze Age Crete demonstrates, as with other Minoan visual art forms, not only a sophisticated technological knowledge (in this case of metalwork) and an ingenuity of design but also a joy...
Minoan Frescoes
Article by Mark Cartwright

Minoan Frescoes

Frescoes are the source of some of the most striking imagery handed down to us from the Minoan civilization of Bronze Age Crete (2000-1500 BCE). Further, without written records, they are often the only source, along with decorated pottery...
Wine in the Ancient Mediterranean
Article by Mark Cartwright

Wine in the Ancient Mediterranean

Wine was the most popular manufactured drink in the ancient Mediterranean. With a rich mythology, everyday consumption, and important role in rituals wine would spread via the colonization process to regions all around the Mediterranean coastal...
The Olive in the Ancient Mediterranean
Article by Mark Cartwright

The Olive in the Ancient Mediterranean

Olives and olive oil were not only an important component of the ancient Mediterranean diet but also one of the most successful industries in antiquity. Cultivation of the olive spread with Phoenician and Greek colonization from Asia Minor...
Minoan Pottery
Article by Mark Cartwright

Minoan Pottery

The ever evolving pottery from the Minoan civilization of Bronze Age Crete (2000-1500 BCE) demonstrates, perhaps better than any other medium, not only the Minoan joy in animal, sea and plant life but also their delight in flowing, naturalistic...
The Island Kingdom of Aegina: The Old Gods Still Whisper Their Truths
Article by Joshua J. Mark

The Island Kingdom of Aegina: The Old Gods Still Whisper Their Truths

Today, traveling an hour by ferry from Piraeus, the port of Athens, the first remnant of Aegina’s great past a visitor will see is the lonely pillar of Apollo rising from the trees on the hill of Kolona. Once a splendid complex of three...
Ships in the Ancient Mediterranean
Image Gallery by Mark Cartwright

Ships in the Ancient Mediterranean

The Egyptians, Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans all prospered in the ancient Mediterranean thanks to their mastery of the sea which allowed them to fish, trade, win naval battles and establish new cities far from their own coastal waters...