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Aegina
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Aegina

Aegina is an island in the Saronic Gulf, south of Athens. It was one of Greece's early maritime powers, famous for minting the earliest coins in Greece which were accepted all over the Mediterranean region. According to the classical...
Economy & Trade in Ancient Greece
Lesson Pack by Marion Wadowski

Economy & Trade in Ancient Greece

We have prepared five lesson plans including classroom activities, assignments, homework, and keys as well as: Multiple choice quiz questions in an excel format Glossary of keywords and concepts in an excel format Open questions...
Naxos
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Naxos

Naxos, with an area of 430 km², is the largest island in the Cyclades archipelago. The island enjoyed its most prosperous periods in the early Bronze Age and again in the Archaic and Classical periods. Naxos in Mythology In certain...
The Minoans and Mycenaeans: Civilizations of the Bronze Age Aegean
Video by Ancient History Encyclopedia

The Minoans and Mycenaeans: Civilizations of the Bronze Age Aegean

The Minoans and the Mycenaeans were both powerful civilizations of the Bronze Age Aegean, and often they are through to follow one after the other. However, this comparison video will detail through some of the similarities and differences...
The Delian League, Part 6: The Decelean War and the Fall of Athens (413/2-404/3 BCE)
Article by Christopher Planeaux

The Delian League, Part 6: The Decelean War and the Fall of Athens (413/2-404/3 BCE)

The sixth and last phase of the Delian League begins with the Decelean War, also referred to as the Ionian War, and ends with the surrender of Athens (413/2 – 404/3 BCE). The final nine years of the Delian League became the most chaotic...
Trade in Ancient Greece
Article by Mark Cartwright

Trade in Ancient Greece

Trade was a fundamental aspect of the ancient Greek world and following territorial expansion, an increase in population movements, and innovations in transport, goods could be bought, sold, and exchanged in one part of the Mediterranean...
The Minoans & Mycenaeans: Comparison of Two Bronze Age Civilisations
Article by Kelly Macquire

The Minoans & Mycenaeans: Comparison of Two Bronze Age Civilisations

The Bronze Age Aegean in the eastern Mediterranean encompassed several powerful entities: the Minoans on Crete; the Mycenaeans on mainland Greece, and the Cypriots on Cyprus. These cultures are often examined separately, and thus the...
Cycladic Sculpture
Article by Mark Cartwright

Cycladic Sculpture

The Cycladic islands of the Aegean were first inhabited by voyagers from Asia Minor around 3000 BCE and a certain prosperity was achieved thanks to the wealth of natural resources on the islands such as gold, silver, copper, obsidian and...
The Phoenicians - Master Mariners
Article by Mark Cartwright

The Phoenicians - Master Mariners

Driven by their desire for trade and the acquisition of such commodities as silver from Spain, gold from Africa, and tin from the Scilly Isles, the Phoenicians sailed far and wide, even beyond the Mediterranean’s traditional safe limits...
Mycenaean Pottery
Article by Mark Cartwright

Mycenaean Pottery

The pottery of the Mycenaean civilization (1550-1050 BCE), although heavily influenced by the earlier Minoans based on Crete, nevertheless, added new pottery shapes to the existing range and achieved its own distinctive decorative style which...