Spain: 1001 Sights. An Archaeological and Historical Guide

Review

Lidia Pelayo Alonso
by
published on 02 September 2015
Rating: star star star star star

Spain: 1001 Sights is not a regular book on Archaeology, but a guide through the historical and archaeological heritage of Spain. Inside this guide you will find a large variety of cave paintings, dolmens and menhirs, Iberian and Celtic villages, Roman monuments and villas, churches and monasteries. This list of monuments includes those already known by the general public, but also those remaining in secret for most of the people, providing a unique journey to the roots of Spanish history while discovering hidden places throughout the Iberian geography.

The book is divided into two parts: in the first pages you can find an introduction with different historical periods and features for each period (including architectural and artistic characteristics as well as some recommended readings). The information given is only a short introduction may seem childish to experts or students of the field, but it can be really useful for those who do not know much about Spanish history. However, the main interest of this book, and what makes it valuable, is the large part where archaeological sites are described. Within each site or monument section, you can find a brief description of the type of site, its history and, moreover, a detailed guide to access the sites by car since sometimes they may not have a clear signal indicating the way. Furthermore, sometimes a contact number of the guide or the closest information office is also added. Although it was published by James M. Anderson in 1991, the access information keeps being valid, except some contact numbers that may have changed.

In summary, although it may seem an old study on Spanish archaeology, it is still valid for those interested on a different journey through a country with a rich history that remains unknown for most of the people.