Roman Water Main from Augusta Raurica

Illustration

James Blake Wiener
by
published on 27 November 2018
Roman Water Main from Augusta Raurica

The arch shown here was part of an underground water main, which from c. 70 CE, brought large quantities of water to Augusta Raurica, which is located in present-day Switzerland. It supplied the public baths, latrines, and water fountains, as well as private buildings. The water was drawn from the Ergolz River at the site of the modern Swiss village of Lausen. The water main followed a gentle and regular decline over a distance of about 6.5 km (4 miles). From a distribution reservoir on the edge of Augusta Raurica, the water was led into town via pressure pipes made from lead or wood.


About the Author

James Blake Wiener
James is a writer and former Professor of History. He holds an MA in World History with a particular interest in cross-cultural exchange and world history. He is a co-founder of Ancient History Encyclopedia and formerly was its Communications Director.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Wiener, J. B. (2018, November 27). Roman Water Main from Augusta Raurica. Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.ancient.eu/image/9584/

Chicago Style

Wiener, James B. "Roman Water Main from Augusta Raurica." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Last modified November 27, 2018. https://www.ancient.eu/image/9584/.

MLA Style

Wiener, James B. "Roman Water Main from Augusta Raurica." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 27 Nov 2018. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

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