Mural of Cleopatra and Caesarion as Venus and Cupid

Illustration

Arienne King
by Unknown Artist
published on 14 March 2018
Mural of Cleopatra and Caesarion as Venus and Cupid

This mid-1st Century BCE mural portrays a statue of Venus and the infant Cupid in the Temple of Venus Genitrix, Rome. The statue has been identified as the infamous gilded statue of Cleopatra VII as Venus that Julius Caesar unveiled during the temple's dedication in 46 BCE.

The depiction of Caesarion, Cleopatra’s son by Caesar, would have been controversial following Cleopatra's defeat by Octavian at the Battle of Actium in 31 BCE. Although Octavian spared Cleopatra's statues, Caesarion remained a delicate subject, which explains why the owner hid the mural behind a brick wall.

(The House of Marcus Fabius Rufius, Pompeii)

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Artist, U. (2018, March 14). Mural of Cleopatra and Caesarion as Venus and Cupid. Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.ancient.eu/image/8287/

Chicago Style

Artist, Unknown. "Mural of Cleopatra and Caesarion as Venus and Cupid." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Last modified March 14, 2018. https://www.ancient.eu/image/8287/.

MLA Style

Artist, Unknown. "Mural of Cleopatra and Caesarion as Venus and Cupid." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 14 Mar 2018. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

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