Standing Taishaku Ten Sculpture

Illustration

by
published on 19 December 2017

This sculpture dates from 10th-century CE Japan and is made of wood with polychrome. It depicts the deity Sakra Devanam Indra (or "Taishaku Ten" in Japanese). This deity may be traced back to Indra, a god of war in ancient India who was alted adopted into Buddhism as a protective deity. Because of these origins, he is usally shown clad in armor, although this unusual rendition is an exception. This specimen is carved from a single, soild piece of wood and characterized by flowing robers that create a "Y" shape around the waist, emphasizing the thickness of the thighs in a distinctive style that was popular in the 10th century CE. (Tokyo National Museum)



About the Author

James Blake Wiener
James is a writer and former Professor of History. He holds an MA in World History with a particular interest in cross-cultural exchange and world history. He is a co-founder of Ancient History Encyclopedia and its Communications Director.

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