Nemean Temple of Zeus

Illustration

Mark Cartwright
by
published on 09 May 2012
Nemean Temple of Zeus

The temple of Zeus at Nemea was constructed in c. 330 BCE and replaced an earlier temple which had stood from the 6th to 5th century BCE. Inside was a cult statue of the god. The temple was composed of an exterior Doric peristyle (6x12 unusually tall and slim columns) with an interior Corinthian colonade, topped by a second story of the Ionic order. There were no sculpted decorations on the exterior. It is regarded as the last of the great Doric temples of the Classical tradition. The temple measures a little over 20x42m, the material used is locally quaried limestone. Three of the now standing columns have stood since original construction (slighty darker colour), the others have been repositioned in the early 2000's CE using the orginal, fallen drums.


About the Author

Mark Cartwright
Mark is a history writer based in Italy. His special interests include pottery, architecture, world mythology and discovering the ideas that all civilizations share in common. He holds an MA in Political Philosophy and is the Publishing Director at AHE.

Remove Ads

Advertisement

Related Links

Cite This Work

APA Style

Cartwright, M. (2012, May 09). Nemean Temple of Zeus. Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.ancient.eu/image/618/

Chicago Style

Cartwright, Mark. "Nemean Temple of Zeus." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Last modified May 09, 2012. https://www.ancient.eu/image/618/.

MLA Style

Cartwright, Mark. "Nemean Temple of Zeus." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 09 May 2012. Web. 23 Jul 2019.

Remove Ads

Advertisement