Gold Mounts from Sutton Hoo

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 06 October 2016

These enigmatic mounts may have been emblems of office. Rivets and rivet-holes show that some were attached to other objects, perhaps bone or ivory rods that decayed in the ground. The most elaborate mount comprises a gold filigree (beaded wire) ring attached to a strip with cabochon (domed) garnet settings. A similar setting was found elsewhere in the burial. The fluted strip has an animal-head terminal, while wolf-like beasts appear on the triangular and curved mounts. Donated by Mrs. Edith M. Pretty. Early 600s CE. From the ship-burial mound 1 at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England, UK. (The British Museum, London).



About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

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