Egyptian Hunting in the Marshes

Illustration

by
published on 15 September 2014

These paintings from the tomb of Nebamun (c. 1350 BCE) show the New Kingdom period accountant Nebamun hunting birds in the marshes of Egypt. He is accompanied by his wife and daughter. Scenes like these of the deceased enjoying himself were common in New Kingdom tomb chambers.

To the Egyptians, fertile marshes were a symbol of eroticism and rebirth, which gives additional meaning to this image.

On display at the British Museum, London, UK.


About the Author

Jan van der Crabben
Jan is the Founder and CEO of Ancient History Encyclopedia, leading the non-profit company and its team to best fulfil its mission. He is passionate about history, education, and web technology.

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