Elephant Symbolism on the Coins of Ptolemy I

Illustration

Branko van Oppen
by
published on 10 May 2019
Elephant Symbolism on the Coins of Ptolemy I

Two coins issued by Ptolemy I:
1) A portrait of the deified Alexander the Great wearing an elephant scalp on his head, with a ram’s horn over his temple, and an aegis (sacred fleece) over his shoulder; on the reverse Athena Alcidemus, the patroness of Pella
Silver tetradrachm, Alexandria, c. 312/1-305 BCE; Nomos no. 12, lot 120.
2) A portrait of Ptolemy with diadēma (royal headband) and aegis; on the reverse a deified Alexander holding a thunderbolt and scepter standing in a chariot drawn by four elephants
Gold stater, Cyrene or Alexandria, c. 305/4-298 BCE; CNG no. 84, lot 751.

About the Author

Branko van Oppen
Branko van Oppen is an exhibition curator and independent scholar specialized in Ptolemaic queenship as well as Hellenistic art and ideology.

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APA Style

Oppen, B. V. (2019, May 10). Elephant Symbolism on the Coins of Ptolemy I. Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.ancient.eu/image/10578/

Chicago Style

Oppen, Branko V. "Elephant Symbolism on the Coins of Ptolemy I." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Last modified May 10, 2019. https://www.ancient.eu/image/10578/.

MLA Style

Oppen, Branko V. "Elephant Symbolism on the Coins of Ptolemy I." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 10 May 2019. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

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