Facade of Inanna Temple from Uruk at the Iraq Museum

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 21 March 2019
Facade of Inanna Temple from Uruk at the Iraq Museum

This is part of the facade of the temple of goddess Inanna at Uruk (modern-day Warka, southern Iraq) and is made of bricks. There are standing male and female deities in alternating niches. Both hold a vase, pouring water in double streams, which flow symmetrically to outline the niches; the streams may represent the Tigris and Euphrates. The male is thought to be god Ea (of water) while the female is thought to be Inanna (of love and war). The Kassite ruler Karaindash (according to the cuneiform inscription) commissioned the construction of this temple with the courtyard of the precinct Eanna (House of Heaven), at Uruk. Late 15th century BCE. It is on display at the Iraq Museum in Baghdad, Republic of Iraq.


About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2019, March 21). Facade of Inanna Temple from Uruk at the Iraq Museum. Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.ancient.eu/image/10276/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama S. M. "Facade of Inanna Temple from Uruk at the Iraq Museum." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Last modified March 21, 2019. https://www.ancient.eu/image/10276/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama S. M. "Facade of Inanna Temple from Uruk at the Iraq Museum." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 21 Mar 2019. Web. 24 Oct 2019.

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