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Cambyses II
Definition by Daan Nijssen

Cambyses II

Cambyses II (r. 530-522 BCE) was the second king of the Achaemenid Empire. The Greek historian Herodotus portrays Cambyses as a mad king who committed many acts of sacrilege during his stay in Egypt, including the slaying of the sacred Apis...
Rhodes
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Rhodes

Rhodes, with an area of 1,400 km², is the largest island in the Greek Dodecanese group located in the south-eastern Aegean. The island was an important protagonist in wider Greek and Mediterranean affairs throughout the Bronze Age, Archaic...
Egyptian Gods - The Complete List
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Egyptian Gods - The Complete List

The gods and goddesses of Ancient Egypt were an integral part of the people's everyday lives. It is not surprising then that there were over 2,000 deities in the Egyptian pantheon. Some of these deities' names are well known: Isis...
Athens in the Hellenistic World
Article by Ian Worthington

Athens in the Hellenistic World

When we think about ancient Athens, it is almost always about the classical city. We think of such things as its numerous monuments (the Parthenon on the Acropolis for example), beautifying everywhere, the Agora swarming with people doing...
Trade in Medieval Europe
Article by Mark Cartwright

Trade in Medieval Europe

Trade and commerce in the medieval world developed to such an extent that even relatively small communities had access to weekly markets and, perhaps a day’s travel away, larger but less frequent fairs, where the full range of consumer...
The Minoans & Mycenaeans: Comparison of Two Bronze Age Civilisations
Article by Kelly Macquire

The Minoans & Mycenaeans: Comparison of Two Bronze Age Civilisations

The Bronze Age Aegean in the eastern Mediterranean encompassed several powerful entities: the Minoans on Crete; the Mycenaeans on mainland Greece, and the Cypriots on Cyprus. These cultures are often examined separately, and thus the...
Justinian's Plague (541-542 CE)
Article by John Horgan

Justinian's Plague (541-542 CE)

During the reign of the emperor Justinian I (527-565 CE), one of the worst outbreaks of the plague took place, claiming the lives of millions of people. The plague arrived in Constantinople in 542 CE, almost a year after the disease...
Fish Sauce in the Ancient World
Article by Declan Henesy

Fish Sauce in the Ancient World

The production and trade of fish sauce in the ancient world was a significant and widespread industry, stretching from Britain to the Black Sea. Roman fish sauce, known as garum, was one of the most popular and commonly used ingredients in...
On the Path of Early Christianity in Marseille
Article by Mathilde Montpetit

On the Path of Early Christianity in Marseille

Today, Marseille is known more for its modern history – World War II, North African immigration, and, of course, the rousing choruses of France’s national anthem, La Marseillaise. Yet it is also one of France’s most ancient...
Greek World Heritage Sites
Article by Heinrich Hall

Greek World Heritage Sites

Greece, the ‘cradle of western civilization’, is home to a large number of spectacular sites from the ancient world, several of which have been placed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. These sites of great historical importance...