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The Archaeological Excavations at Magdala
Article by Andrea Garza-DíazB

The Archaeological Excavations at Magdala

Magdala, known as Migdal in Hebrew (מִגְדָּל: tower) and also as Taricheae (Ταριχέα, from the Greek Τάριχος or tarichos: preserved by salting or drying fish), was an important...
The Trial of Anne Hutchinson
Article by Joshua J. Mark

The Trial of Anne Hutchinson

Anne Hutchinson (l. 1591-1643 CE) was a religious dissident who was brought to trial by John Winthrop (l. c. 1588-1649 CE) and the other magistrates of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1637 CE for spreading "erroneous opinions" regarding...
Ancient Christianity’s Effect on Society & Gender Roles
Article by Rebecca Denova

Ancient Christianity’s Effect on Society & Gender Roles

Christianity began as a sect of Judaism in Judea in the 1st century CE and spread to the cities of the Eastern Roman Empire and beyond. In these cities, non-Jews, Gentiles, wanted to join the movement, and these Gentile-Christians soon outnumbered...
The Batavian Revolt
Article by Jona Lendering

The Batavian Revolt

Batavian revolt was a rebellion of the Batavians against the Romans in 69-70 CE. After initial successes by their commander Julius Civilis, the Batavians were ultimately defeated by the Roman general Quintus Petillius Cerialis. The year...
The Battle of Pharsalus
Article by Mark Cartwright

The Battle of Pharsalus

Pharsalus, in eastern Greece, was the site of a decisive battle in 48 BCE between two of Rome's greatest ever generals: Pompey the Great and Julius Caesar. After several previous encounters, Pharsalus, the biggest ever battle between Romans...
Mythological Re-Enactments in Ancient Roman Spectacle
Article by Dana Murray

Mythological Re-Enactments in Ancient Roman Spectacle

To this day the ancient Romans remain infamous for their dramatic use of spectacle and other forms of entertainment. A lesser known variation of Roman spectacle is the mythological re-enactments that took place during the ludi meridiani (midday...
Banking in the Roman World
Article by Victor Labate

Banking in the Roman World

Just as in other ancient civilizations, the first banks in Rome began in the temples consecrated to the ancient Gods. Many temples held in their basements the Romans' money and treasure, and were involved in banking activities such as lending...
Roman Tunnels
Article by Victor Labate

Roman Tunnels

The first tunnels in the Mediterranean were built to transport water from distant springs and mountains to arid areas and cities. They also ensured the constant supply of water when cities were under siege. For example, the 533 m (583 yards...