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Mosaic with Chariot-racing Scene
Image by Carole Raddato

Mosaic with Chariot-racing Scene

Mosaic depicting a quadriga of the factio russata (‘the Reds,’ representing the summer), 3rd century CE, from Rome. (National Archaeological Museum of Spain, Madrid)
Victorious Roman Charioteer
Image by Carole Raddato

Victorious Roman Charioteer

Mosaic depicting a victorious charioteer called Marcianus accompanied by the wish of victory NICHA (sic). Nika is a given name of Greek origin meaning "Victory" (latinized as Nica). Marcianus' lead horse is named as Inluminator and bears...
Mongol Circus
Image by Metropolitan Museum of Art

Mongol Circus

This handscroll was created c. 1271 - 1644 CE in the style of Zhao Yong (1289 – c. after 1360 CE)by an unidentified Chinese artist. The scroll was created during either the Yuan Dynasty or the Ming Dynasty. Ink and color on silk. 27 x...
Rome's Egyptian Heritage
Article by Wanda Marcussen

Rome's Egyptian Heritage

The Eternal City of Rome is one of the places in the world with the most historical sites to visit. The list of ancient ruins, museums, churches, and other historical landmarks makes the city an Eldorado for anyone interested in...
Constantinople
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Constantinople

Built in the seventh century BCE, the ancient city of Byzantium proved to be a valuable city for both the Greeks and Romans. Because it lay on the European side of the Strait of Bosporus, the Emperor Constantine understood its strategic importance...
Rome under the Julio-Claudian Dynasty
Article by Donald L. Wasson

Rome under the Julio-Claudian Dynasty

The Julio-Claudians were the first dynasty to rule the Roman Empire. After the death of the dictator-for-life Julius Caesar in 44 BCE, his adopted son Octavian - later to become known as Augustus (r. 27 BCE - 14 CE) - fought...
Theatre of Marcellus
Article by Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Marcellus

The theatre of Marcellus was the largest and most important theatre in Rome and completed in the late 1st century BCE during the reign of Augustus. The architecture of the theatre would become a standard feature of theatres across the empire...
Romulus and Remus
Definition by Brittany Garcia

Romulus and Remus

In Roman mythology, Romulus and his twin brother Remus were the founders of the city of Rome. They were the children of Rhea Silvia and Mars (or in some variations the demi-god hero Hercules) and their story is recorded by many authors including...
Helios
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Helios

Helios (also Helius) was the god of the Sun in Greek mythology. He was thought to ride a golden chariot which brought the Sun across the skies each day from the east (Ethiopia) to the west (Hesperides) while at night he did the return journey...
Castor and Pollux
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Castor and Pollux

Castor and Pollux (the Dioscuri) are figures from Greek and Roman mythology considered the twin sons of Zeus or Jupiter. Semi-divine figures, they were credited with the role of saving those in trouble at sea or in grave danger in war...