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A Visual Glossary of Classical Architecture
Article by Mark Cartwright

A Visual Glossary of Classical Architecture

[image:945] Abacus - a large slab placed above the column capital to support the architrave or an arch placed above it. [image:1097] Akroterion - a decorative piece added to the roof of a temple at the apex and corners, usually made...
The Arch of Constantine, Rome
Article by Mark Cartwright

The Arch of Constantine, Rome

The Arch of Constantine I, erected in c. 315 CE, stands in Rome and commemorates Roman Emperor Constantine’s victory over the Roman tyrant Maxentius on 28th October 312 CE at the battle of Milvian Bridge in Rome. It is the largest surviving...
Mythological Re-Enactments in Ancient Roman Spectacle
Article by Dana Murray

Mythological Re-Enactments in Ancient Roman Spectacle

To this day the ancient Romans remain infamous for their dramatic use of spectacle and other forms of entertainment. A lesser known variation of Roman spectacle is the mythological re-enactments that took place during the ludi meridiani (midday...
Daily Life in Ancient Rome
Collection by Mark Cartwright

Daily Life in Ancient Rome

The daily life of Roman citizens, at least in the big cities, was anything but dull. Assuming one could get away from one's civic duties and household chores, there were many activities available to distract and entertain. A trip to the...
The Architecture of Ancient Rome
Collection by Mark Cartwright

The Architecture of Ancient Rome

Roman architecture was nothing if not eclectic. From ingenious underfloor heating to gravity-defying arches, the Romans added to the Classical repertoire such grandiose structures as the triumphal arch, basilica, amphitheatre, and city tower...
Roman Circus of Mérida
Image by Carole Raddato

Roman Circus of Mérida

The Roman circus of Mérida is a ruined Roman circus in Mérida (Spain), the Roman city of Emerita Augusta. Inaugurated in the first quarter of the first century CE, it was used for chariot racing, and was modelled on the Circus Maximus in...
Circus Maximus Reconstruction
Image by B. Fletcher

Circus Maximus Reconstruction

An illustration of what the Circus Maximus chariot track of Rome might have looked like. The Circus Maximus dates back to the 6th century BCE but was at its most splendid in the 1st century CE when it had a capacity for 250,000 spectators...
Circus Maximus [Present Day]
Image by Mark Cartwright

Circus Maximus [Present Day]

The view of Rome's Circus Maximus in the present day. The original circus lies 9 m below ground level and was first laid out in the 6th century BCE. The present site was remodelled in the 1930s CE to resemble the original.
Circus Maximumus in Ancient Times - 3D View
3D Image by Lithodomos VR

Circus Maximumus in Ancient Times - 3D View

The Circus Maximus is the oldest and largest circus in Rome, built in the long valley between the Aventine and Palatine hills. It exceeded all other Roman circuses in length, width, and capacity. The main activity of the Circus Maximus was...
Mosaic with Circus Scene
Image by Carole Raddato

Mosaic with Circus Scene

Mosaic depicting a quadriga of the factio prasina (‘the Greens,’ representing the spring), 3rd century CE, from Rome. (National Archaeological Museum of Spain, Madrid) The green team is victorious. Their admired steeds have performed splendidly...