The History of Tyre, Vol. 10

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Book Details

Author  Wallace Bruce Fleming
Publisher  Forgotten Books
Publication Date   June 21, 2012
ISBN 
Pages  184

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The Phoenicians wrote the record of their civiH zation in achievements, not in books. This great people contributed almost nothing to the literature of the world, though they made possible all the literature of the western and near eastern nations. The Phoenicians were masons, carpenters, shipbuilders, weavers, dyers, glass-blowers, workers in metal, merchants, navigators, discoverers: if they were not actually the first to invent the alphabet, at least they so improved the art of writing that their system has been adopted and has been used by almost the whole civilized world. They surpassed all other peoples of antiquity in enterprise, perseverance and industry. They succeeded in showing that as much glory might be won and as enduring a power might be built up by arts and industries as by arms. Of the Phoenician cities, Tyre was the most important; it was so important that the Greeks gave its name to the whole region, calling it vpC a, from IIU Tsur, Tyre, and the Greek name is perpetuated to this day in our wordS yria? It is remarkable that the Tyrians should have occupied so high a place in human history for twenty-five hundred years and yet have left the world no body of literature and no written 1H erodotus (V, 58) says that the Phoenicians who came with Cadmus (DT p) ofT yre introduced in Greece many arts, among them alphabetical writing, and that the letters of the alphabet are justly called Phoenician. While it is generally admitted that the Phoenicians introduced letters, modern authorities seek to trace the elements and suggestions of their alphabet to earlier sources. For a full discussion of the subject seeP liny, Natural History, VII, 57; Rawlinson, Herodotus, Vol. II, p. 313; Kxall, Studien zur Geschichte des Alten A gypten, III, Tyrus und Sidon (V ien, 1888), pp. 15-21, 66. 2R awlinson, History of Phoenicia, p. 39. Herodotus (VII, 63) speaks o
(Typographical errors above are due to OCR software and don't occur in the book.)

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