The Ramessides, Medes and Persians

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Book Details

Author  Emmet Sweeney
Publisher  Algora Publishing
Publication Date   November 2, 2007
ISBN  0875865429
Pages  220

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Description

The chronology of ancient Egypt and Babylonia is wrong to a dramatic degree, with some major historical events mis-dated almost 2000 years before they actually occurred, according to a controversial new book.

Ages in Alignment argues for a complete reconstruction of ancient chronology. Part 4 brings the reconstruction to a close. The 19th Dynasty is shown to have ended in 525 BC with the Persian Conquest, and the last important 19th Dynasty ruler, Seti II, is shown to have never ruled an independent Egypt.

The histories of the Near Eastern civilizations are generally believed to have commenced around 3300 BC, about 2,000 years before those of China and the New World. Yet Ages in Alignment demonstrates that the Near Eastern cultures had no 2,000-year head start. All the ancient civilizations arose simultaneously around 1,100 BC, in the wake of a terrible natural catastrophe recalled in legend as the Flood, or Deluge.
The four volumes of Ages in Alignment reconstruct the histories of the Near Eastern cultures, from the rise of the first monarchies around 1,100 BC until the conquest of Alexander.
Ages in Alignment is an originally-researched reconstruction which begins with the start of literate civilization (actually introduced to the Nile Valley from Mesopotamia by the Abraham tribe) and ends with the conquest of Alexander.
Inspired by Velikovsky's 1952 series Ages in Chaos, this series seeks to complete the work which Velikovsky commenced, identifying the problems he could not solve and bringing forward a great body of evidence which supports his claims, including the identification of Hatshepsut with the Queen of Sheba.
Velikovsky was rejected by the academic establishment because of a number of contradictions in the chronology he outlined. Sweeney shows that despite some gaps and incompletions, his books were brilliant works of scholarship with much to recommend them. For decades now scholars have attempted to solve the enigma. Yet the answer was stunningly simple, and in front of us all the time.
Volume 4, The Ramessides, Medes and Persians, brings the reconstruction to a close. The 19th Dynasty is shown to have ended in 525 BC with the Persian Conquest, and the last important 19th Dynasty ruler, Seti II, is shown to have never ruled an independent Egypt. He was the same person as Inaros, the Egyptian rebel leader who battled against the Persians in the time of Xerxes and Artaxerxes I. Ramses III, of the 20th Dynasty, is revealed to be identical to Nectanebo I of the 30th Dynasty, who defeated the Persian Artaxerxes II. Ramessides, Medes and Persians also shows that the so-called Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Babylonian kings were actually Persians using Semitic names. So for example Sargon II was Darius I, Sennacherib was Xerxes, Esarhaddon was Artaxerxes I and Nebuchadrezzar was Artaxerxes III.

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