User: JPryst

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submitted on 31 July 2014
Aristippus of Cyrene (c. 435-356 BCE)  was a hedonistic Greek philosopher who taught that the meaning of life was pleasure and that the pursuit of pleasure, therefore, was the most noble path one could pursue. Along with Plato, Xenophon, Antisthenes, and others, he was one of the followers of Socrates. He was also the first of Socrates' students... [continue reading]
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submitted on 31 July 2014
Antisthenes (c. 445-365 BCE) was a Greek philosopher who founded the Cynic School of Athens. He was a follower of Socrates and appears in Plato’s Phaedo as one of those present at Socrates’ death. He is one of the primary interlocutors in Xenophon’s works Memorabilia and Symposium. Antisthenes, like Crito, was among the older students... [continue reading]
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submitted on 12 August 2014
Sammu-Ramat (reigned 811-806 BCE) was the queen regent of the Assyrian Empire who held the throne for her young son Adad Nirari III until he reached maturity. She is also known as Shammuramat, Sammuramat, and, most notably, as Semiramis. This last designation, `Semiramis’, has been the source of considerable controversy for over a century... [continue reading]
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submitted on 03 August 2014
Semiramis is the semi-divine Warrior-Queen of Assyria whose reign is most clearly documented by the Greek historian Diodorus Siculus (90-30 BCE) in his great work Bibliotheca Historica (`Historical Library’) written over thirty years, most probably between 60-30 BCE. Diodorus drew on the works of earlier authors such as Ctesias of Cnidus... [continue reading]
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submitted on 03 August 2014
The reign of Assyrian king Sennacherib (705-681 BCE) was chiefly characterized by his difficulties with Babylon. Throughout the history of the Assyrian Empire Babylon had caused problems and had even been destroyed by the Assyrian king Tukulti-Ninurta I in c. 1225 BCE. Even so, there were direct cultural bonds between Babylon and Ashur, capital... [continue reading]
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submitted on 18 August 2014
Sargon of Akkad (also known as Sargon of Agade and Sargon the Great, reigned 2334 to 2279 BCE), the founder of the Akkadian Empire, was a man keenly aware of his times and the people he would rule over. While he was clearly a brilliant military leader, it was the story he told of his youth and rise to power which exerted a powerful influence over... [continue reading]
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submitted on 03 August 2014
Originality in literary compositions in the ancient world did not carry the same weight and value as it does in the present day. In recent centuries, an author is applauded for the creation of an original work, whether fiction or non-fiction, and is derided for plagiarism or for passing off a work as a true account - especially an eye witness, first-person... [continue reading]