Ancient History Encyclopedia

About

Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

We combine different media, subjects and periods in interactive ways that will help readers understand both the "big picture" and the detail. Editorial review is a key component in our process to ensure highest quality.

Partners

We have a content sharing agreement with the non-profit arts website artwis, by the Kunstpedia Foundation.


We have a content sharing agreement with Chickasaw TV, the online channel of Chickasaw Nation.


We have a content sharing agreement with EAGLE, the Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy.


The European Commission's eLearning portal is recommending us as an open education resource.


We are an open education resource listed in the OER Commons.


We have a content sharing agreement with the history media company Past Preservers.


We are a contributing member of the academic Pelagios network.


We have a content sharing agreement with the photo archive SquinchPix.


We have a content sharing partnership with the interest-based content discovery platform Theneeds.

Advert

Remove ads - become a member

Statistics

702 definitions
438 articles
2,633 illustrations
257 videos
6,391 references
3,496 tags
59,451 registered users

Latest Content

Become a Member

We're a non-profit organisation and we need your help: Producing free content and running this website costs money. Join our membership programme and support us with only $5 per month, and in return you'll have an advertising-free version of this website, print versions of articles, and additional benefits. Thank you for your support!

by
published on 25 February 2015
Senebkay's skull shows clear impact marks of an axe In collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities, a University of Pennsylvania team discovered new evidence on the life and death of pharaoh Senebkay, founder of the 16th Dynasty of the Second Intermediate Period of Egypt. The pharaoh's skeleton's forensic analysis performed by researchers directed... [continue reading]
by
published on 25 February 2015
Stela found at Taposiris Magna, inscribed in Hierglyphic and Demotic side by side. The SCA Archaeological Mission in collaboration with the Catholic University of Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) working at the Taposiris Magna site succeeded in discovering a limestone stele inscribed with Hieroglyphic and Demotic inscriptions. The Minister... [continue reading]
by
published on 23 February 2015
I was chatting with my uncle about the archaeological reliefs in the Governorate of Sulaymaniyah. The Governorate is part of Iraqi Kurdistan and is about 400 km north-west of Baghdad. He said that he saw a relief in the year 1985 on a top of a mountain, south-west of the city of Sulaymaniyah. The name of the relief, as the local villagers call it, is Naram-Sin... [continue reading]
by
published on 22 February 2015
Nestled in the middle of the Iglesiente mountains in the southwestern part of Sardinia, the ruins of the Punic-Roman Temple of Antas offer visitors a truly majestic sight. After lying abandoned for centuries, the temple was discovered in 1838 and extensively restored in 1967. Most impressively, the original Ionic columns were excavated and re-erected... [continue reading]
by
published on 20 February 2015
The Creative Assembly has produced a short documentary on Attila the Hun to celebrate the launch of their latest historical computer game, Total War: ATTILA (also read our interview with the game's lead designer). This seven minute film summarizes the life of Attila, his achievements, his cruel reputation, and his legacy. The documentary mixes narrative... [continue reading]
by
published on 19 February 2015
The Roman Republic was expanding, enlarging its sphere of influence along the Adriatic, so when several of the southern Greek city-states appealed to them to ward off the advances of Philip V of Macedon, they entered into the fray, commencing a series of what became known to history as the Macedonian Wars. In June of 168 BCE, the Roman general Lucius Aemilius... [continue reading]
by
published on 19 February 2015
One of the most important discoveries in marine archaeological history occurred in 1998, just off Indonesia's Belitung Island in the western Java Sea: A 1,200-year-old Arabian dhow with an astounding cargo of gold, silver, ceramic artifacts, coins, and tangible personal effects. The ship's hold contained some 57,000 pieces in total and yet no human remains... [continue reading]
by
published on 17 February 2015
Teotihuacan, located in the Basin of Central Mexico, was the largest, most influential, and certainly most revered city in the history of the New World, and it flourished in Mesoamerica's Golden Age, the Classic Period of the first millennium CE. Dominated by two gigantic pyramids and a huge sacred avenue, the city, its architecture, art, and religion... [continue reading]
by
published on 13 February 2015
  Ancient history is becoming more and more popular in gaming, but you rarely find a game that truly tries to bring ancient history to the modern world. Enter Apotheon, an indie game developed by the small team at Alientrap games, which looks like an animated scene from ancient Greek Black Figure Pottery. The game not only looks ancient... [continue reading]
by
published on 10 February 2015
* Photo by L.Sergius.Paulus (Own work) , via Wikimedia Commons (cropped) Use and Re-Use of Digital Cultural Heritage Assets – Interoperability, Repositories and Shared infrastructures 11-12 March 2015 Athalassa Campus 20 Konstantinou Kavafi Street 2121, Aglantzia Nicosia, Cyprus Use and Re-Use of Digital Cultural Heritage Assets... [continue reading]
by
published on 10 February 2015
Rock art (also known as parietal art) is an umbrella term which refers to several types of creations including finger markings left on soft surfaces, bas-relief sculptures, engraved figures and symbols, and paintings onto a rock surface. Cave paintings, above all forms of prehistoric art, have received more attention from the academic research community... [continue reading]
by
published on 09 February 2015
Yaxchilan, located on the banks of the Usumacinta River in the Yucatán peninsula of Mexico, was an important Late Classic Maya centre. The Maya dated the founding of their city to 320 CE, but Yaxchilan flourished between c. 580 and c. 800 CE, benefitting from commerce via the Usumacinta River and trading in copal resin and dyes processed from Brazil... [continue reading]
by
published on 08 February 2015
Cratinus was a highly successful writer of Attic Old Comedy, but the very fragmentary nature of his surviving plays means that he is not as well remembered as Aristophanes (eleven of whose plays come down to us intact). Despite this, it is possible to uncover significant information regarding this sometimes forgotten comic poet by looking at his own comic fragments... [continue reading]
by
published on 07 February 2015
The Incas controlled a vast empire which included four climate zones and, consequently, their agricultural produce was diverse. The people of the ancient Andes were largely vegetarian, occasionally supplementing their diet with camelid meat and seafood if they could get it. The Inca state developed a huge farming apparatus, where crops and herds were commandeered... [continue reading]
by
published on 06 February 2015
The Roman Republic owed much to the cultural influence of its Greek neighbors. For centuries the Greeks occupied a prominent position to the south on the island of Sicily. A series of wars in the 2nd and 3rd centuries BCE brought to the city a tremendous Hellenic presence: art, literature, philosophy, and most significantly, religion. Although a rich religious tradition... [continue reading]
by
published on 05 February 2015
The Greek alphabet is the writing system developed in Greece which first appears in the archaeological record during the 8th century BCE. This was not the first writing system that was used to write Greek: several centuries before the Greek alphabet was invented, the Linear B script was the writing system used to write Greek during Mycenaean times... [continue reading]
by
published on 04 February 2015
History verifies the importance of religion not only on a society’s development but also on its survival; in this respect the Romans were no different than other ancient civilizations. During the formative years of the Roman Republic, especially after its territorial acquisitions following the Four Macedonian Wars, contact with the Greek culture -- especially... [continue reading]
by
published on 04 February 2015
Over the last few centuries, acting has developed into visual art that entertains people around the world in the form of stage plays or, in recent times, through the mediums of television and film. However, acting as we know it originated thousands of years ago with quite a different audience in mind. It developed as a weeklong competition ushering in... [continue reading]
by
published on 03 February 2015
Tulum, on the east coast of the Yucatan peninsula in southern Mexico, was an important Mesoamerican centre which displayed both Maya and Toltec influence. Tulum was a major trading and religious centre between the 11th and 16th centuries CE and, dramatically situated near the sea, it is one of the most evocative ancient sites in Mexico.   First settled... [continue reading]

Advertisement

Remove ads - become a member

Featured Image

Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter:

Follow Us

Remove ads - become a member