The Tongue Tower, Temple of Nabu, Borsippa

Remove ads - become a member


published on 12 April 2014

The ziggurat, the "Tongue Tower," today one of the most vividly identifiable surviving ziggurats, is identified in the later Talmudic and Arabic culture with the Tower of Babel. However, modern scholarship concludes that the Sumero-Akkadian builders of the Ziggurat in reality erected it as a religious edifice in honor of the local god Nabu, the "son" of Babylon's Marduk, as would be appropriate for Babylon's lesser sister-city. Modern Biris Namrud, Babil governorate, Iraq

About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Board-certified consultant neurologist and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm is very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artefacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Help us write more

We're a small non-profit organisation run by a handful of volunteers. Each article costs us about $50 in history books as source material, plus editing and server costs. You can help us create even more free articles for as little as $5 per month, and we'll give you an ad-free experience to thank you! Become a Member

Share This

Image License

Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike: This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this content non-commercially, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.

Read the licensing terms for more information on how to use this image legally.

Commercial Use

For commercial use, please contact the editors by email () to discuss whether this image can be licensed.

If you are not sure whether your project is commercial then please also get in touch for clarification.


Remove ads - become a member