Lion-hunting Scene, King Ashurbanipal

Edit

Illustration

by
published on 04 February 2014

In ancient Assyria, lion-hunting was considered the sport of kings, symbolic of the ruling monarch’s duty to protect and fight for his people. The sculpted reliefs illustrate the sporting exploits of the last great Assyrian king, Ashurbanipal (668-631 BCE) and were created for his palace at Nineveh (in modern-day northern Iraq).
The hunting scenes, full of tension and realism, rank among the finest achievements of Assyrian Art. They depict the release of the lions, the ensuing chase and subsequent killing. North Palace, room C, panel 20-22, Nineveh, Mesopotamia, reign of King Ashurbanipal, 668-631 BCE. (British Museum, London)



Donate and help us!

We're a non-profit organisation and we need your help! This website costs money and we have to buy quality research material to produce great content. Our donors make this project possible. Please consider donating; even small amounts help. Thank you!

Comments

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

Recommended